Annotated Bibliography and Essay

Annotated Bibliography and Essay. (2) papers

1ST paper: DUE: SUNDAY 1 July 2018 @9:00 pm

MA 2: Annotated Bibliography (150 points)

During Unit 2 we have been reading (and viewing) a variety of different kinds of texts: newspaper articles, a short story, tweets, PSAs, a short student film, social and historical background sources, and scholarly journal articles.

Creating an annotated bibliography will help you to review the different sources you may use for MA 3 and to begin determining which may be the most relevant and most appropriate ones to include, particularly how you may use each one.

Before finalizing your annotated bibliography, you should decide on which option for Major Assignment 3 you will write on (Option A: Why She Stays–Then and Now; Option B: No Voice, No More?; or Option C: Modernization Review–Domestic Violence Then & Now).

You may wish to review the Annotated Bibliography Example on D2L for ideas of how to compose, format, and arrange your annotated bibliography.

What is an annotated bibliography?

A bibliography is a list of sources. (Technically “bibliography” refers to a list of books; hence MLA uses the term “works cited” instead, as this would refer to any kind of text being cited).

An annotation is an explanation or critical note of a text, typically a summary and/or evaluation.

Thus, an annotated bibliography (or annotated works cited list) is a list of sources that also contain explanatory notes regarding each source.

How to compose the annotated bibliography

For each work listed on your annotated bibliography, you should include

1. An MLA citation (in hanging indent) for the work/source

2. An annotation (paragraph) that includes (must include all of the following)

1. A description of what kind of work/source this is: primary or secondary source, genre of work, etc. (1-2 sentences)

2. A brief summary of the contents of the work/source (3-5 sentences)

3. An evaluation of the source’s validity and reliability, of its suitableness for use as a college-level paper source and how you know to trust the information and ideas the source contains, or (more for primary sources) an assessment of the source’s relevance to your investigation and eventual paper (3-4 sentences)

4. A reflection on how you might use the source in your final report (MA 3), and/or about how the source helped you in your research to better understand the larger “conversation” about this topic (3-4 sentences)

Type and center the title Annotated Bibliography across the top of your annotated list of works; this should appear in plain text (no bold, italics, quotation marks, etc.) and in the same size font as the rest of the assignment.

The list should be alphabetized by whatever comes first in each citation (typically the writer’s last name, but could be the title of the work)

Double-space evenly throughout (both the citations and the paragraphs)

Type this as one continuous list; that is, provide the citation and paragraph for the second source immediately after the first; you should not place each source on its own page.

Note: the citation and annotation (paragraph) for each source are paired together–this should not be a list of annotations followed by a works cited list; rather, it is a works cited list with annotations included. (Also, there is no need for a separate works cited page!)

What works to include on the annotated bibliography

You should have a total of seven works listed on your annotated bibliography (20 points each; 140 points total)

The two primary sources you will use for MA 3 (20 points each)

For Option A: Why She Stays—Then and Now

· Glaspell’s short story, “A Jury of Her Peers”

· 4-5 #whyistayed tweets (found on the #whyistayed website)–You may cite all these

·

· Two scholarly journal articles found in the library’s databases (20 points each)

· One of these should be an article that analyzes Glaspell’s story “A Jury of Her Peers” (suggested using the MLA Bibliography; see SWA 6)

· SCHOLARLY JOURNAL ARTICLE ATTACHED: TWELVE GOOD MEN….

· One of these should be an article found on the general topic you are exploring for MA 3 (See SWA 7)

· SCHOLARLY JOURNAL ARTICLE ATTCHED: WHY DOESN’T SHE LEAVE

Three online articles found using a general search engine (Google, Bing, etc.) (20 points each)

· Two (2) of these should be articles that provide historical or social background information relevant to the topic and issues Glaspell raises in her works (See SWA 5)

· One of these should be a current news article regarding an issue related to the topic MA 3 (see SWA 7)

· RELATED ARTICLE I USED: https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/domestic-violence-nearly-three-u-s-women-killed-every-day-n745166

Formatting & Editing

Formatting and editing will account for 10 points of your overall grade.

This will include items such as line spacing, margins, having the proper title in the correct format, use of hanging indent for citations, listing sources in alphabetical order, use of consistent and appropriate font (and font size), punctuation, spelling, grammar, sentence structure, etc.

An Annotated Bibliography Example may be found in the Unit 2 Assignments module on the content page

Example of Annotated Bibliography

Firstname Lastname

English 102-B00

Mr. Cortese

March 26, 2018

Annotated Bibliography

@Ami_chyen. “I was manipulated into thinking everything he did to me was right; even with the gut feelings saying it wasn’t right. #WhyIStayed.” Twitter, 11 Sept. 2014, 9:26 a.m., https://twitter.com/Ami_chyen/status/510102076199043073.

@bevtgooden. “I stayed because my pastor told me that God hates divorce. It didn’t cross my mind that God might hate abuse, too. #WhyIStayed.” Twitter, 8 Sept. 2014, 8:48 a.m., https://twitter.com/bevtgooden/status/509005369444958208.

@leslielouz. “Because he made me believe no one else would understand. #WhyIStayed,” Twitter, 8 Sept. 2014, 6:32 p.m., https://twitter.com/leslielouz/status/509152393913573376

@MillerRachelD. “I was determined to make it work, wanted kids to have their dad, convinced myself that what he did to me wasn’t affecting them #WhyIStayed.” Twitter, 8 Sept. 2014, 6:32 p.m., https://twitter.com/MillerRachelD/status/509152375349977088.

The annotation paragraph will come here. List all the tweets together (or PSAs if you are doing option B) and do one annotation for all of the Tweets (or PSAs). Alphabetize them by where the first one falls alphabetically (this one happens to begin with “Ami” so it comes first). Note the kind of source they are (hint: social media, primary source), and then summarize the tweets. The summary should be 3-5 sentences. Afterwards, evaluate the relevance of them to your project—how well they fit the discussion you will present (3-4 sentences). Lastly, reflect on how you can use these tweets in your paper—what will be their purpose and place in your discussion (3-5 sentences). The other annotations have actual text.

Dessner, Lawrence Jay. “Irony and Innocence in John Updike’s ‘A&P.’” Studies in Short Fiction, vol. 25, no. 3, 1988, pp. 315-17. MLA International Bibliography, http://ezproxy.midlandstech.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=7685859&site=ehost-live. Accessed 9 Mar. 2018.

Dessner’s article comes from a peer-reviewed journal and it analyzes the character of Sammy in Updike’s “A&P.” Dessner argues that while Sammy underrates the “dangers” of the world throughout the story, he ironically overrates them in the end, perhaps further showing his innocence or naiveté. He observes how Sammy innocently derides all the problems of the adult world, rather dismissing their significance. Indeed, he finds faults with the adults—customers, manager, butcher—and does not understand the compromises they make to meet their responsibilities, nor does he recognize what he may become one day. Thus, while Sammy quits, we would think he does not care what the consequences of his actions may be, but instead he overstates how hard the world may be for him from now on. Dessner sheds some insight into how Sammy is struggling to understand what it means to be a responsible adult, and thus can help with analyzing how Sammy is coming of age for MA 1. His analysis of how Sammy derides the customers, Lengel, and McMahon helps reveal how Sammy is innocent of what it means to be an adult and what adults have to do. Dessner reveals that the way Sammy speaks about these people shows he is really immature throughout the story. Further, while Sammy may be beginning to understand the consequences of his actions in the end, his overstatement of this shows he may still be naïve about the world and is still more like a frightened child.

Oates, Joyce Carol. “Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?” Compact Literature: Reading, Reacting, Writing, edited by Laurie G. Kirszner and Stephen R. Mandell, 9th ed., Cengage, 2016, pp. 506-17.

This short story by Oates is one of the primary sources I will be analyzing for MA 1. The protagonist is Connie, a young girl who receives little validation or love from her parents and seeks it from her friends and from boys. She and her friend pretend to go to the movies but sneak across the street to the diner where the older kids hang out, and Connie hooks up with boys and spends time with them down back alleys. One Sunday when her family goes to a family barbecue, Connie stays home listening to music. Arnold Friend, who at first appears to be a teen boy who has come for Connie in his gold-colored car, takes this opportunity to prey on Connie. When Connie realizes he may be older and merely pretending to be young, she grows scared, but she leaves with him in the end with paralyzed acceptance that perhaps she has no choice, as he has threatened both her and her family. Oates’s story can be analyzed for MA 1 to show how Connie comes of age in comparison to Sammy. Connie is certainly a rebellious, immature teen who is looking for love and validation but with little guidance from her parents. She plays with adult sexuality, and Arnold is a representation of both her desire to be part of the wide reaching adult world as well as her fear of the uncertainties that come with entering the adult world. What she learns in the end is that she needs to face her fears and step out into the adult world on her own.

Rubin, Larry. “Oates’s ‘Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?’” Explicator, vol. 42, no. 4, 1984, pp. 57-60. MLA International Bibliography, doi: 10.1080/ 00144940.1984.11483813. Accessed 9 Mar. 2018.

Rubin’s essay is from a peer-reviewed journal (reprinted in our anthology); it is a secondary source that analyzes Oates’s story. Rubin suggests that Arnold Friend is part of a dream or “daymare” that Connie is having. He notes that while Connie plays with sexuality, she may still be a virgin. He observes that she has been lying on her bed listening to music when Arnold shows up, suggesting she may have fallen asleep at this point. Further, the fact that Arnold sounds like the DJ and happens to be listening to the same station as Connie suggests the music she falls asleep to invades her dream. Further, her paralysis near the end is also similar to what happens in dreams. Arnold then psychologically represents her fear of adult sexual fulfillment. Rubin’s article can be used to support my analysis of Connie for MA 1, particularly how Arnold represents her fears of the adult world. If she is still innocent and has merely been experimenting sexually with boys, then she may still have fears of what it means to be fully adult. Thus, Arnold metaphorically represents her fear of becoming a full adult and the dangers that come with it.

Updike, John. “A&P.” Compact Literature: Reading, Reacting, Writing, edited by, Laurie G. Kirszner and Stephen R. Mandell, 9th ed., Cengage, 2016, pp. 238-43.

This is a short story and one of the primary texts that I will be analyzing for MA 1, discussing how the main character comes of age. This is the story of Sammy, a supermarket clerk who is bored with his job. One Thursday afternoon three girls come in dressed only in their bathing suits, and they not only break up the monotony of the store but disrupt the routine of the customers. As they come to Sammy’s counter to check out, Lengel, the store manager, approaches and embarrasses them by telling them they are inappropriately dressed for the store. Sammy decides to quit stand up to his manager and be a “hero” for the girls, only to find that the girls do not stay to thank him and that life continues in the store as normal. Updike’s story will be analyzed for MA 1, comparing how Sammy and Connie come of age. This story shows a young man searching to find his place and be his own person as he works a boring job his parents got for him. It also shows his rebellious stand as he tries to assert his own identity over the policy of the store. Sammy also learns from this that the world will be hard and that a principled stand will not necessarily enact change or earn him praise.

RELATED PAPER ATTACHED. MA#3

This paper will be due at a later date but would like to get them done around the same time

MA 3: Evolving Genres and Social Issues (200 points)

Option A: Why She Stays—Then and Now

In Glaspell’s news reporting on the Hossack Case and in her subsequent short story, readers are given perspectives on this question—“Why do female victims of domestic violence or abuse stay?” 100 years later, in 2014 social activist Beverly Gooden’s Twitter hash tag #whyistayed following the Ray/Janay Rice video of abuse renewed a national conversation about domestic violence and abuse as victims broke silence and spoke on this complex question.

Glaspell’s works (including original news articles on the Hossack case, as well as subsequent short story) and the #whyistayed tweets serve as “primary sources” that enrich our understanding of why victims of domestic abuse stayed “back then” in the early 20th century and why they stay now, here in the 21st century—when it might seem to outsiders that they should” just leave.”

For Option A:

· Conduct research on domestic violence as an issue of the past and present.

· Then draft an essay that formulates a thesis about “why she stayed—then and now” and that uses details from your primary sources (Glaspell’s works and the #whyistayed Twitter hash tag) plus additional secondary sources to support your thesis on this question:

· How have the most pressing reasons that women “stay” changed (or not) from 1916 to 2018?

Required Primary Sources:

· Glaspell’s short story, “A Jury of Her Peers”

· 4-5 #whyistayed tweets (found on the #whyistayed website)

· OPTIONAL: Hossack Case news reports written by Glaspell

Required Secondary Sources:

· One online source located via a general search engine

· One peer-reviewed article located using a library electronic databases

Exploring Audience/Readers for MA 3 Topic Option A:

· Remember that your audience/readers live here in the 21st century, and so while it is likely that they have some familiarity with the Rice case and perhaps with the Twitter hash tag (though how much so will depend on their familiarity with social media), they will not likely be knowledgeable about Susan Glaspell and her writings on this issue back in the early 20th century. They may not be aware of some of the differences then and now in gender roles or expectations/stereotypes, or about socioeconomic class and the lives of farm wives. And they may not know much about the history of domestic violence as a social problem.

Option B: No Voice, No More?

The label “PSA” or “public service announcement” is relatively new (with scholars generally postulating that such announcements were first used prior to television broadcasting by the U.S. government to spread messages about war-related matters during WWII), but of course authors have used their speeches, letters, literary works, and publications for centuries as a way to promote and provoke public thought about difficult (if not taboo) subjects.

There is a way in which Glaspell’s short story serves a similar rhetorical purpose—to raise awareness about the then-socially-taboo topic of the oppression of women within marriages, and particularly those living with physical or psychological abuse by their partner, ruing an era in which women’s rights were being debated.

This topic option asks you to do some thinking about the similarities and differences allowed by the “genre” that is being used TO provoke discussion and reconsideration of current social attitudes towards an issue.

For Option B:

· After watching No More’s three PSAs on domestic violence—“Listen,” “Text Talk,” and “Speechless”–and thinking back to Glaspell’s short story, write an essay in which you compare/contrast what works by Glaspell and No More demonstrate about “voice” (both having and not, speaking and listening) in relation to “domestic violence or abuse” (think, too, about “silences” and “silencing”):

· Comparing the ways in which Glaspell’s story then and No More’s PSAs now raise awareness, what do this demonstrate about how the social dynamics of domestic abuse have both changed and stayed the same over time? About how our society understands and addresses this topic?

· You may conduct and/or make use of secondary research on domestic violence today.

· You may conduct and/or make use of secondary research on Glaspell’s connection to the women’s rights movement.

Required Primary Sources:

· Glaspell’s short story, “A Jury of Her Peers”

· No More’s 3 PSAs: “Listen,” “Text Talk,” and “Speechless” (you may also consider No More’s other campaigns as well)

Required Secondary Sources:

· One online source located via a general search engine

· One peer-reviewed article located using a library electronic databases

Exploring Audience/Readers for MA 3 Topic Option B:

· Remember that your audience/readers live here in the 21st century. So it is likely that they have some familiarity with general debates about gender oppression and representations of women in today’s media, and some general knowledge about the advancement (and continuing problems) of women’s legal and civic rights. Your audience may even have heard about/know about No More’s PSA campaigns (two of the 3 PSAs were aired during past Super Bowls as commercials). Even so, you will still need to introduce those PSAs to help readers see them in the light in which you are examining them—in relation to the theme of “silencing” or “voice.”

· However, your audience may not be very aware of some of the differences between “then and now” in social expectations and silences on taboo topics like domestic abuse and oppression of women that Glaspell was concerned with in her works. And though most generally educated readers would know something about Susan Glaspell as an early feminist writer, most readers will not likely be specifically knowledgeable about Susan Glaspell and her work with this issue back in the very early 20th century. You will need to introduce them to Glaspell’s work so that you can talk about what her work demonstrate about “voice” and the power that women did or did not have in that time period, as well as what could or could not be “said” and/or “heard” between genders.

Option C: Modernization Review–Domestic Violence Then & Now

Film-makers and TV producers, in their turn, have taken Glaspell’s work and transformed it yet again, either interpreting her short story through choices of staging, setting, costuming, and acting, or through dramatizing an adaptation of Glaspell’s original story itself in film and on stage in modern re-enactments.

In August 2009, student film-maker Steven Kale posted to YouTube a two-part short drama entitled “Judgment” which is listed as an adaptation of “A Jury of Her Peers.” More specifically, Kale’s short film works to “remediate” or “modernize” Glaspell’s original story for 21st century audiences.

For Option C:

· Conduct research on domestic violence here in the 21st century via at least two secondary sources.

· Then write an essay in which you review Kale’s adaptation, focusing on what aspects of Glaspell’s original short story are captured in the film. Do the film and the short story focus the viewer’s attention on similar or different aspects of the social issue of domestic abuse/violence?

· Use your primary and secondary sources on domestic violence today to support your argument/analysis about the extent to which Kale’s dramatization satisfactorily “updates” Glaspell’s original story for our current time and historical context.

Required Primary Sources:

· Glaspell’s short story, “A Jury of Her Peers”

· Kale’s two-part modernization, Judgment

Required Secondary Sources:

· One online source located via a general search engine

· One peer-reviewed article located using a library electronic databases

Exploring Audience/Readers for MA 3 Topic Option C:

· Remember that your audience/readers live here in the 21st century, and so while it is likely that they have some familiarity with the Rice case and perhaps with the Twitter hash tag (though how much so will depend on their familiarity with social media), they will not likely be knowledgeable about Susan Glaspell and the extent of her work on this issue back in the early 20th century. They may not be aware of some of the differences then and now in gender roles or expectations/stereotypes, or about socioeconomic class and the lives of farm wives. And they may not know much about the history of domestic violence as a social problem.

Guidelines and Requirements for all Topic Options:

· Your essay should contain at least 6 paragraphs:

· Introduction

· At least 4 body paragraphs (more will be ok)

· Conclusion

· Each body paragraph should contain one point you are making in support of your thesis and should contain:

· A topic sentence stating the point you are making

· Just enough evidence in the form of quotations or paraphrases (not long summaries or passages) to illustrate this point

· An in-text (parenthetical) citation for all evidence

· An explanation of the evidence and what it shows or how you are reading it

· You must turn in copies of any and all secondary sources you use, with the passages you quoted highlighted.  If you do not turn these in with the final draft of your essay, it will be considered late.  Note that you will not need to submit the entire article; just the pertinent pages (those you used and those containing citation information).

· Include a Works Cited page (last page of your essay) listing all primary and secondary sources you discuss and refer to. For help with works cited, consult the MLA Works Cited handout, the Purdue OWL–“MLA Formatting and Style Guide”, and/or Ch. 27 (pp. 544-71, 590) in EAA.

· Do not use first person (I, we, my) or second person (you, your) pronouns (unless part of a quote).\

· Do not use contractions (It’s, don’t, they’re, hasn’t, etc.).

· The essay should be word processed and conform to the guidelines on the MLA Format handout.

· The essay should be 4-5 pages (not including the works cited page)–more is ok.

· Staple or paper clip all work together—including drafts, critical sources, etc. Do this before coming to class to turn in your essay. Loose pages will not be accepted.

· Note: any intentional plagiarism (using information from any source without citing or referencing it) may result in the assignment receiving no credit and the case being reported to the college.

Annotated Bibliography and Essay

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